Faqs

The short answer is yes. All of our therapists are either licensed by the PA state or the AOBTA (The American Organization for Bodywork Therapies of Asia).
When they are license under the state they are been called as Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT). When the are regulated under the AOBTA, they are called Asian Bodywork Therapy (ABT).


For relaxation and to work out the day to day aches and pains, massage can have an immediate impact. Everyone coming in stressed or sore should leave feeling better than when they came in. But it is not uncommon to get a massage and still feel the pain or soreness after, or even to feel a bit worse immediately.

The effects of the massage may take time to manifest. You may walk out feeling that you still have the issue you came in with but the next day it’s resolved.

If you come in with acute pain from something like a back spasm or extreme soreness from your first ski session of the year, you may actually get a bit more sore as massage itself can trigger some inflammation. It is like taking Vitamin C once you have a cold – it may help you recover faster, but the cold still needs to run its’ course.

Sometimes you won’t notice a significant difference even after a day or more. It could be that you are doing something to re-create, or maintain the problem. Some of the effects of massage are cumulative, and you may find that coming in regularly results in enhanced benefits. Sometimes you will be benefited with a different type of massage, or with someone who can check your body mechanics to see if you may be using your body less efficiently than possible.

While we strive to give the best massage every time, sometimes it may take a session or two to really understand what works best for you. Just like a hairdresser may take a few cuts to know how your hair falls, and what styles you prefer, we learn more as we get to know you better.


Most of us would get massages almost daily if we could afford the time and money.

Many of the effects of massage are cumulative, adding up over time. Most people who want to make massage a regular part of their health maintenance will get massages every 1 – 6 weeks. Others just come in when they have the time. We never pressure people to come more often than they want – we believe that it is your responsibility to determine your own needs, and we would never want you to feel guilty for coming less often than we recommend.

For acute problems, like overwork or muscle spasms, you may want to come weekly or even more often for a series. If you are in pain, you should always feel more relaxed after the massage, although the pain may linger a while. The massage itself, especially if deep, can cause some inflammation. It may be a day or 2 for this to subside and you to feel better.

For chronic problems, general massage may relax you and release the muscular tensions that make it worse. Obviously, massage won’t prevent pain from structural or neurological causes like herniated disks or diabetic neuropathy from returning. But when pain causes us to tense muscles, we begin a pain-spasm cycle gets worse and worse. Massage can help break that cycle.


This is a common inquiry about massage. Most people start with an hour massage. That’s enough time to cover the entire body. A half hour is only enough time for a specific area or two – such as back and neck. A lot of people prefer to come in for an hour and 1/2, as that way they can get the full body massage, with extra time on any problem areas.


Many clients are unsure if and/or how much they should tip their massage therapist. We recommend you think of your massage therapist as you would a waiter in a restaurant. They love what they do and your tip should reflect your appreciation for their service. Tipping percentages should be based on the full price of a regular massage. Remember, our therapists have a very physical job.


Make yourself comfortable. If your therapist wants you to adjust your position, she or he will either move you or will ask you to move what is needed. Otherwise, change your position anytime to make yourself more comfortable. Many people close their eyes and relax completely during a session; others prefer to talk. It’s up to you. It is your massage, and whatever feels natural to you is the best way to relax. Do not hesitate to ask questions at any time.


Swedish massage is what many people think of when massage is mentioned. It uses long light strokes, deep kneading, small friction-type motions, light tapping, and movement of the joints. The list of other specialized techniques is long. Ask your massage therapist to explain any other techniques he or she uses.